The very first engine to power a dentist’s drill was a pedal-operated spinning wheel introduced at the end of the 18th century, reportedly by American President George Washington’s dentist, John Greenwood. This was the extent of the dental engine’s technology until the dawn of electricity another century later. By that time, a reclining folding dental chair had been invented, with an encased motor beside or inside the chair to power dentists’ drills. This station has evolved to incorporate many tools of the denatal field — from sink basins and water flossers to high-lumen lights and suction-supplying air compressors.

Dentists in search of a new dental air compressor can begin by searching for models with oil-free reliability. Oil and dentistry simply do not mix. Every operatory requires compressed air to function and operate. However, if the air a dentist uses to run their practice has poor quality, the effects can be extremely detrimental. Having unclean air can negatively impact not only the patient- but the staff, dentist, various procedures and operating costs as well.

Dental air compressors are essential for performing some of the most routine tasks in dentistry, and digital image equipment has become a staple of today’s offices.   About 74% of adults believe that an unattractive smile can hurt their career success, and 100% of dentists should know that they cannot restore a smile without the right kind of dentist equipment. One of the most basic and essential tools for dentists is a dental air compressor.

Dentists should select a model with dry reliability. With newer models of dental air compressors that are now capable of removing moisture from compressed air, you can ensure that your air is both high in quality, extremely dry, and most importantly, safe.  A dental air compressor helps a practice to actually run on a daily basis. By searching for a model with these four key components, a dentist can ensure a sound addition to any operatory and help keep patients and staff healthy and operating costs at a minimum.

Some units are portable, allowing practitioners to move them around as needed. Others are mounted in a practice. For hygiene reasons, the dental air compressor is typically attached to short tubing. Dentists may place a unit between two treatment rooms, for example, providing access from either side while leaving the tubes short to reduce the risk of breeding bacteria. The best option for a facility can depend on the number of patients it sees and the kinds of procedures it performs with the use of compressed air.

Original source: http://www.chinadentalsupplier.com/2017/01/06/242/