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Knowing More about Dental Air Compressor

Le 23 mai 2017, 08:52 dans Humeurs 0

The very first engine to power a dentist’s drill was a pedal-operated spinning wheel introduced at the end of the 18th century, reportedly by American President George Washington’s dentist, John Greenwood. This was the extent of the dental engine’s technology until the dawn of electricity another century later. By that time, a reclining folding dental chair had been invented, with an encased motor beside or inside the chair to power dentists’ drills. This station has evolved to incorporate many tools of the denatal field — from sink basins and water flossers to high-lumen lights and suction-supplying air compressors.

Dentists in search of a new dental air compressor can begin by searching for models with oil-free reliability. Oil and dentistry simply do not mix. Every operatory requires compressed air to function and operate. However, if the air a dentist uses to run their practice has poor quality, the effects can be extremely detrimental. Having unclean air can negatively impact not only the patient- but the staff, dentist, various procedures and operating costs as well.

Dental air compressors are essential for performing some of the most routine tasks in dentistry, and digital image equipment has become a staple of today’s offices.   About 74% of adults believe that an unattractive smile can hurt their career success, and 100% of dentists should know that they cannot restore a smile without the right kind of dentist equipment. One of the most basic and essential tools for dentists is a dental air compressor.

Dentists should select a model with dry reliability. With newer models of dental air compressors that are now capable of removing moisture from compressed air, you can ensure that your air is both high in quality, extremely dry, and most importantly, safe.  A dental air compressor helps a practice to actually run on a daily basis. By searching for a model with these four key components, a dentist can ensure a sound addition to any operatory and help keep patients and staff healthy and operating costs at a minimum.

Some units are portable, allowing practitioners to move them around as needed. Others are mounted in a practice. For hygiene reasons, the dental air compressor is typically attached to short tubing. Dentists may place a unit between two treatment rooms, for example, providing access from either side while leaving the tubes short to reduce the risk of breeding bacteria. The best option for a facility can depend on the number of patients it sees and the kinds of procedures it performs with the use of compressed air.

Original source: http://www.chinadentalsupplier.com/2017/01/06/242/

How to Use Ultrasonic Scaler to Do Dental Cleaning

Le 4 mai 2017, 09:29 dans Humeurs 0

Air polishing has been compared to scaling and rubber-cup polishing for efficiency and effectiveness of stain and plaque removal. The literature overwhelmingly supports the use of the air polisher as an efficient and effective means of removing extrinsic stain and plaque from tooth surfaces. Air polishing requires less time than traditional polishing methods and removes stain three times as fast as scaling with comers. In addition, less fatigue to the operator has been mentioned as an important benefit of air polishing.

Dental hygienists generally use several tools during a dental cleaning, including a tooth polisher and a scaler. Tooth polishers buff teeth and eliminate tiny pieces of plaque. They generally have several different sized heads for cleaning hard to reach places. Scalers look a bit like metal hooks and are used to remove hard plaque, especially between teeth. Some people find the use of a scaler uncomfortable, depending on their sensitivity level, pain threshold, the length of time since the last cleaning, and the extent of plaque build-up.

Researchers and manufacturers caution against prolonged use of the air polisher on cementum and dentin. When moderate to heavy stain is present on root surfaces, dental hygienists are often faced with the problem of removing it with the least alteration of cementum. One choice is to leave the stain and explain to the patient that stain is not associated with oral disease and will not harm the teeth or gingiva since it is only a cosmetic concern. To many patients, this is not a viable choice since appearance is considered so important in today’s society.

Other choices include removing the stain with a rubber cup polisher and prophylaxis paste; sonic, ultrasonic scalers; Dental Hand Instruments or the air polisher. Wilkins recommends removing as much stain as possible during root planing with curets. However, in one in-vitro study, air polishing was shown to remove less root structure than a curet in simulated three-month recalls for three years. Woodall agrees that the air polisher may be preferable to curets in this situation. Since less root structure is removed, decreased root-surface( root canal treatment equipment ) sensitivity also may be a benefit.

Because polishing with a rubber cup and prophylaxis paste has been shown to remove the fluoride rich layer of enamel and cause marked loss of cementum and dentin over time, this method of stain removal has been challenged Rubber cup polishing with prophylaxis pastes, therefore, may not be a suitable method for moderate-to-heavy stain removal on enamel, cementum, or dentin.

Original source: http://www.oyodental.com/blog/2017/05/02/how-to-use-ultrasonic-scaler-to-do-dental-cleaning/